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NURSING COMMUNICATION - VERBAL AND NON-VERBAL Page1
   - THE NEW NURSE
TOPICS A - B  C-D  TOPICS E - H  TOPICS I - P  TOPICS Q - Z     Bulletin Board   SITE INDEX
Nursing process (ADPIE), non-verbal communication of the
ventilated patient, tachycardia, suctioning, compassion, empathy,  
simple explanations, distrust of staff and Maslow's Hierarchy
Verbal Communication
It is an established fact that most communication is verbal.
However, it should be underscored that verbal communication
skills can be
lacking. An example of this is outlined below:

The Surgical/PACU
The nurse who did not explain to the postoperative patient
the importance of
deep breathing exercises to prevent
pneumonia, instead she medicated her for pain and let her
go to sleep for many hours. The patient was later
assessed
by the nurse on the next shift.  A decrease in
breath sounds
was noted on assessment. The second nurse took the
trouble to explain the need for aggressive deep breathing
exercises, to prevent postoperative pneumonia.

Please watch the video above for more examples of verbal
and non-verbal communication.
THE STROKE PATIENT
The stroke patient may not be able
to communicate due to expressive
aphasia. Here is a sample of a
nursing diagnosis/problem of a
stroke patient:
- At risk for impaired gas exchange
- at risk for
falls
- at risk for difficulty
swallowing/speaking
- impaired
mobility
Dear nurses how good are
your communication skills?
Enjoy learning more.
MASLOW'S HIERARCHY OF NEEDS

Sessions 39 addresses Maslow's
Hierarchy of Needs in the Clinical
Setting and the Care Plan
THE NURSING PROCESS
From the time a patient is admitted to
the hospital, the
nursing process
begins. It is identified in 5 steps:
A  -  Assessment
D  -  
Diagnosis
P  -  Planning
I   -  
Implementation
E  -  Evaluation
Nursing Communication
Page 2
Poor Communication Skills

The video above describes when the
communication skills of a nurse has
been
lacking. Instead of a new birth
leaving good memories, the
scars of
poor communication are left
COMMUNICATION SKILLS VERBAL AND NON-VERBAL
Like it or not, every nurse engages in communication. Having
effective skills in the nursing profession, is of paramount importance.
A nurse
communicates on an average shift with:
- the doctor, coworkers, patients and their families, designates
responsibilities when in charge,
pharmacy, therapist and more

NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION
The patient who is unable to communicate verbally, is at a loss.
The patient who is
intubated and on a ventilator is unable to speak
and
tell the nurse what his needs are.
Discomfort, like
pain, may be identified by signs such as
agitation, a rise in heart rate and blood pressure on the monitor.
The patient may even try to reach for his
ET tube.
A mucous plug may also obstruct the airway or tubing, resulting in
the
ventilator alarms going off and patient agitation.
Disconnection from the ventilator may cause agitation in the
ventilated patient.

The
stroke patient with expressive aphasia, the patient with a
tracheostomy, who has not learned to speak are all examples of
patients who have difficulty with
verbal communication.
The nurse is able to demonstrate skills that allow for effective
communication like
using a chart and pointing, to identify the needs
of the patient.

Another example of non-verbal communication is a nurse entering
a patient's room, with an
unwelcoming expression on the nurse's face
and goes about work like the patient is not included as part of the
care. All the while not saying anything to the patient.